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The Black Russian Terrier was developed in the former USSR by the state for use as a military / working dogs.
After the World War II the number of service dogs was greatly reduced, while the demand for them increased: they were needed to guard the prisons and POW camps, as well as industrial and strategic objects. To increase the dog population, they started bringing them from the occupied countries.
Back in the 1930s, the Central School of Cynologists (“Red Star” Kennel) carried out hybrid experiments in order to create new progressive breed for the USSR and the Army. After the World War II the number of service dogs was greatly reduced, while the demand for them increased: they were needed to guard the prisons and POW camps, as well as industrial and strategic objects. To increase the dog population, they started bringing them from the occupied countries.
This was when Roy the Giant Schnautzer found his way into the kennel. First they crossed him with Airedale terrier bitches. The first litter was received in 1951. On the second stage the Giant Schnauzer was crossed with the Rotweiller. On the third stage the Giant Schnauzer was crossed with the Moscow water dog (Newfoundland X German shepherd X Eastern European shepherd). Then those hybrids were crossed among themselves. Additional breeds were added later on, but their contribution was not significant.
In 1954 the standard for the Black terrier went into work, and later the same year the dogs were shown at the All-Union Exhibition of Economy Achievements (Moscow) where they received high marks from experts. In 1957 43 Black terriers took part in the All-Union Exhibition of Service and Hunting Dogs. They attracted many of professional breeders, and the breed group was recognized as having future potential. Later that year the 2nd and 3rd generation Black terriers were first time released to private dog owners who praised the dog’s qualities and continued their breeding.
In 1979 the Red Star Kennel and Army Navy and Fleet Volunteer Support Organization (DOSAAF) approved the standard for the Black terrier breed. More than 800 litters have been received by that time, and the majority of more than 4000 puppies were recognized to be in compliance with standard. As the dogs of the breed group reached a relatively high exterior level, became more noble and uniform in type, a new standard which would recognize the Black terrier breed was proposed. The Black terrier became a breed in 1985 and recognized by AKC on July 1, 2004.